Studying in the library
Image: Warwick Media Library

SU announces more study spaces to arrive on campus

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More study spaces are due to arrive on campus next October, according to an announcement by the Students’ Union last Tuesday. The new spaces, a response to the “study space crisis” are expected to be in place by the start of the next academic year.

The new spaces, which will be installed across campus, include group study furniture in the Physics Concourse, an expansion on the Social Sciences corridor and work ledges in the language corridor of the Humanities Building.

The first floor inside the Rootes Building, opposite Bar Fusion, will receive more study furniture and and technical infrastructure, while the Westwood campus will see an improved cafe alongside major refurbishments, “with the aim of transforming it into a genuine learning hub.”

In the announcement, posted on incoming SU President Hope Worsdale’s blog, the SU pledged to continue working to improve study spaces on campus: “Though these changes will not solve the study space crisis, they are significant positive steps towards ensuring that our existing campus spaces are facilitating student learning in the best way possible.”

Though these changes will not solve the study space crisis, they are significant positive steps towards ensuring that our existing campus spaces are facilitating student learning in the best way possible.

“However, this is just the beginning. The SU and the University are committed to continuing to work together to provide further study spaces for Warwick students, and ensuring that the student voice is at the heart of future space developments.

“There is still plenty of work to be done in this area, and as an SU we look forward to building on the positive collaborations of this year and striving for a campus where students are getting the best possible deal when it comes to study spaces.”

The new development comes after consistent complaints of over-crowding in the library and campus learning grids during exams. Other efforts to fix the problem have included the space hog initiative in the library, which alerts students to when desks have been left reserved for over 40 minutes, and the 24-hour library which came into effect on October 31 last year.

This followed an SU campaign launched two years earlier and a survey which found that 83% of students were in favour of round-the-clock hours throughout the academic year.

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