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BoJack Horseman Season Six Part One review

Few shows in recent memory have guaranteed as consistently a good time, with a free dose of tragedy included, as BoJack Horseman. Since coming onto Netflix in 2014 the show has provided laughs, biting satirical insights, conceptual episodes and quite possibly an increased demand for antidepressants. The story of a washed-up Hollywood celebrity trying to come to terms with himself in an insane Hollywood world has run strongly for five seasons, but all good stories come to an end. And so, we have the final season, Season 6, albeit in two parts, the first of which is available now on Netflix.

After the tragic events at the end of the previous season, a statement which could fit on almost any BoJack Horseman season recap, BoJack has gone to rehab, allowing the show to take aim at the exploitative side of the rehab industry: because free capitalism and being content are at odds. BoJack’s story of redemption, a long and difficult road which brings up many past traumas takes some interesting turns here. We see him butt heads with an industry that thrives on people being open but also coming back for hugely expensive therapy. We see how he developed his alcoholic habit and how, in typical BoJack style, it was a far more complex and damaging process than we might have conceived. He provides help for some people by being there for them and at other times he nearly destroys their careers. It’s a compelling story, and one which gives us a great deal of tempered hope for him, as it’s clear by the end of the season that BoJack’s past is going to catch up with him no matter how much progress he makes.

BoJack’s story of redemption, a long and difficult road which brings up many past traumas takes some interesting turns here

As for everyone else the sixth series begins to look towards giving certain characters closure and resolutions, while also dropping more and more pain onto them in ever hilarious fashions. Todd is Todd, the only user of an asexual dating app and apparently the world’s best nanny. Diane finally gets a chance to break away from her life in LA, albeit one which throws her head-first into depression in Chicago. Princess Carolyn has to be a mother who can do it all, career and a new baby. The second episode in particular focuses on her and it’s an amazing visual showcase of how stressful early motherhood can be as we see dozens of Carolyn trying to satisfy her baby in every scene. Mr Peanutbutter and Pickles have their troubles too as his infidelity comes to light. Though much of this season may sound tragic it still is hilarious, especially when during this particular relationship meltdown, a dozen or so characters are having to stay hidden through acrobatics and social media.

The second episode in particular focuses on her and it’s an amazing visual showcase of how stressful early motherhood can be as we see dozens of Carolyn trying to satisfy her baby in every scene

As ever though the characters are only part of the show’s comedic brilliance, the stories that are woven around them are just as intricate and well-constructed as ever. Corporate monopolies make for a prime target, with White Whale swallowing every intellectual property it can find. Hollywood PA’s, driven by BoJack trying to help someone end up going on strike and bringing the industry to a standstill. There’s even a His Girl Friday subplot in the final episode as we go full screwball comedy with none of the main characters even in sight.

BoJack Horseman is a show which once it has an idea and rolls with it is unstoppable, a juggernaut of laughs and revelations which is as fun to watch as it is painful and honest. There’s no other way to recommend it other than saying if you enjoyed season 1-5 then this is more, and looks to set up a strong conclusion for these characters we have come to love in all their dysfunction.

 

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