Image: Unsplash
Image: Unsplash

Makeup Shaming- In defence of a full-face of Makeup

I am well-aware that I wear a fair amount of makeup. But I don’t wear it to impress men or because I feel self-conscious, as many may think. For me, along with many other individuals, it is a hobby. Sometimes I will grab an eyeshadow palette just before bed and experiment to see what I can do with it – clearly, that’s not to impress men or to make myself feel less self-conscious.

Makeup shaming is not a new thing. For years, women have been called “fake” or “unattractive” for wearing too much makeup. Instead, we need to view it as something you use to enhance what you already have – contour and highlight can enhance your cheekbones, whilst mascara and eyeliner can make your eyes ‘pop’.

Online there is a risk of being fooled by Photoshop and while makeup can do a lot, it can’t achieve what Photoshop can

The “take her swimming on the first date” jokes on Twitter have been going for years. It brings the ‘catfish’ fear to life – not only the fear of someone looking different online to in person, but someone looking different with and without makeup. However, an individual who looks different with beauty products is completely different to someone lying about who they are.

 Not only does this joke shame those who choose to wear makeup, it is also sexist. It begs the stereotype that women wear makeup just to impress men, which is not true in so many cases.

Another joke which is another unfortunate incident of makeup shaming is that makeup tutorials, that present a “before and after” transformation, give people “trust issues”. Rarely do I see someone with makeup in person where they look completely different. Online there is a risk of being fooled by Photoshop and while makeup can do a lot, it can’t achieve what Photoshop can.

Glossier, a new cult beauty brand, seems to respond to this fine line between “you’re wearing too much makeup” and “you look tired”

Many Twitter users love to reinforce the idea that “a lot of makeup is unattractive” and, whilst they can express their opinion, a lot claim that men “don’t like it” and they’d rather women chose not to wear it. Personally, I am comfortable in my skin but I choose to make the effort. I don’t wear it to impress people. I wear it because it’s fun and I enjoy making a special effort when I go out.

Glossier, a new cult beauty brand, seems to respond to this fine line between “you’re wearing too much makeup” and “you look tired”. It aims to reduce and simplify your beauty bag. Founded by Emily Weiss, the company was launched online in America in 2014, but was only available to buy in the UK from October 2017.

 The aim of the company is to create products based on the feedback of consumers. Marketing is Photoshop-free and instead focuses on photos of customers looking fresh-faced – the “no-makeup” look. It promises to cover blemishes whilst allowing your freckles to show through.

If you look past the sexist and belittling comments, you may see that for many, makeup is a form of enjoyment and a hobby

 The brand focuses on skin care, ensuring that you look naturally as good. The brand caters to individuals who want to look more natural, as opposed to a “full-coverage, full contour” look.

 Despite Glossier’s view of wanting to make women feel comfortable in their own skin, I don’t believe that this is the reason for makeup. If you look past the sexist and belittling comments, you may see that for many, makeup is a form of enjoyment and a hobby, not for the pleasure of others.

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