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How I got into Warwick through Adjustment

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I came to Warwick University via Adjustment. UCAS Adjustment is the process of looking for an alternative course when you have met and exceeded conditions for your firm choice, which you did not receive an unconditional offer for. Every year, Adjustment is available from A level results day.

Three years ago, upon receiving my results, I realised that I had exceeded my original firm offer, and decided to look into the process of Adjustment. Unlike Clearing options, courses available via Adjustment are not available in one place. Therefore, I directly contacted the universities that I was interested in, to see whether they would consider me. Alternatively, it is also worth looking into the universities website as in many cases, such as Warwick, they post a list of courses available.

If they decide they want to offer you a place, they can do this via UCAS straight away.

With results day causing telephone lines to be very busy, there is likely to be some wait. It is important to bear in mind that the universities may take your details and contact you later with an outcome. As a result, it would be wise to use two different phones if you can: I contacted them via the house number, and gave them my mobile number to contact me back, so that they can contact me wherever they are, or if I was busy using the house phone to contact other universities. This is important because sometimes universities may decide to give your offer to somebody else if they are unable to get through to you.

The process off receiving an offer is very different to Clearing. Instead of applying to a particular course as you would have done when choosing your options, with Adjustment you give the universities your personal ID number and they will instantly be able to see your application. If they decide they want to offer you a place, they can do this via UCAS straight away, rather than waiting to receive an application from you. I would strongly advise you to make your intentions clear: if you are only asking about the possibility, then make sure the university is aware otherwise they may confirm your place via UCAS.

If I could offer any advice to people considering using Adjustment, it would be to not rush any decisions.

Despite this, remember that even if you register to use Adjustment on UCAS, it is not compulsory. You are simply registering your interest, so that potential universities are able to see your application when you contact them. Therefore, do not feel pressured to accept the first offer you get. If you feel like your firm choice is perfect for you, go with your gut instinct!

If I could offer any advice to people considering using Adjustment, it would be to not rush any decisions. Think about why you are considering Adjustment – what exactly is it about your firm choice that you do not like? Do the universities you are looking into tackle these problems? Is the course right for you? I would also suggest looking into things like accommodation – most students tend to live on campus in their first year, which is not always guaranteed for students coming in via Adjustment.

Whilst it is important to speak to teachers and UCAS advisors for advice, at the end of the day only you know what is best for you.

Whilst it is important to speak to teachers and UCAS advisors for advice, at the end of the day only you know what is best for you. Whilst I kept my parents informed of my intention to look at other universities on results day, I also found it helpful to let them not interfere too much – they have had all summer to tell me what they think, results day is my day, not theirs.

It is important to note that information on Adjustment is not as widespread as it is with Clearing. If you are undertaking research on the process, make sure it is from a verifiable source – I found a lot of conflicting information!

Finally, congratulations! You have come so far, and should be so proud of yourself!

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